Editorial Staff

Founders / Executive Editor
R.C. Smith
Beth M. Titchiner (co-founder)

Contributors and Reviewing Editors

  • Johanna Tirnthal
    Johanna Tirnthal
  • Dustin Byrd
    Dustin Byrd
  • Gustavo Racy
    Gustavo Racy
  • María Castel
    María Castel
  • Penny Cole
    Penny Cole
  • Alexander Katsanis
    Alexander Katsanis
  • Daniel Tutt
    Daniel Tutt
  • Glenn Parton
    Glenn Parton
    Fellow
  • Michael Laurence
    Michael Laurence
  • Ben Fulman
    Ben Fulman
  • Andrew Feenberg
    Andrew Feenberg
  • Gordon Asher
    Gordon Asher
  • Rudolf J. Siebert
    Rudolf J. Siebert
  • Stephen Eric Bronner
    Stephen Eric Bronner
  • Adam Bell
    Adam Bell
  • Martyn Hudson
    Martyn Hudson
  • Dr. Peyman Vahabzadeh
    Dr. Peyman Vahabzadeh
  • Sarah Amsler
    Sarah Amsler
    Editor / Fellow
  • Henry Giroux
    Henry Giroux
  • Jose Luis Vivero Pol
    Jose Luis Vivero Pol
  • Raihan Sharif
    Raihan Sharif
    Editor / Fellow
  • Joel R. Pruce
    Joel R. Pruce
  • Elliot Sperber
    Elliot Sperber
  • Douglas Kellner
    Douglas Kellner
  • Dr. Jeanne Willette
    Dr. Jeanne Willette
  • Shirin Housee
    Shirin Housee
  • Marisol Sandoval
    Marisol Sandoval
  • Christian Fuchs
    Christian Fuchs
  • Javier Sethness Castro
    Javier Sethness Castro
  • Merijn Oudenampsen
    Merijn Oudenampsen
  • Stephanie Baran
    Stephanie Baran
  • Simon Clarke
    Simon Clarke
  • Matthew Morgan
    Matthew Morgan
  • Mary Breunig
    Mary Breunig
  • Maria Alina Asavei
    Maria Alina Asavei
  • Karsten Fischer
    Karsten Fischer
  • Magdalena Wisniowska
    Magdalena Wisniowska
  • Fabian Freyenhagen
    Fabian Freyenhagen
  • Richard Hall
    Richard Hall
  • Helene Finidori
    Helene Finidori
  • Ryan Moore
    Ryan Moore
  • Gayle Kimball
    Gayle Kimball
  • Dr. Chris Conti
    Dr. Chris Conti
  • Thomas Swann
    Thomas Swann
  • Beth M. Titchiner
    Beth M. Titchiner
    Co-founder / Fellow
  • Robert Drury King
    Robert Drury King
  • Adrian Wilding
    Adrian Wilding
    Editor / Fellow
  • Richard Gunn
    Richard Gunn
    Editor / Fellow
  • Timothy Hawkins
    Timothy Hawkins
    Editor
  • Michael R. Ott
    Michael R. Ott
    Editor / Fellow
  • R.C. Smith
    R.C. Smith
    Founder / Executive Editor
  • Arnold De Graaff
    Arnold De Graaff
    Fellow
  • Dr Peter Thompson
    Dr Peter Thompson
  • Richard D. Wolff
    Richard D. Wolff
  • Glenn Rikowski
    Glenn Rikowski
  • Michel Bauwens
    Michel Bauwens
  • Chris Cutrone
    Chris Cutrone
Johanna Tirnthal

I was born in Vienna, Austria. Currently, I am a MA student of Cultural Studies at the Humboldt University of Berlin. I specialize in Marxism, Critical Theory and 20th century French philosophy, especially looking at media phenomena and popular culture. From 2010-2014 I did my BA in Film Studies and History at the Freie Universität Berlin (Free University of Berlin). In 2013 I spent one term at the ISCTE-IUL (Instituto Universitário de Lisboa) in Portugal where I did research on the filmic legacy of the Carnation Revolution. This article is a short version of my BA thesis and has already been published in German in the 1/2015 edition of the 360°-Journal. I also work as a radio editor and moderator for the academic podcast Kulturwelle at Humboldt University and for the Austrian public radio Ö1. This is what I mostly tweet about: https://twitter.com/johannatirnthal

Dustin Byrd

Dustin J. Byrd is an Assistant Professor of Humanities at Olivet College in Michigan, USA. He teaches religion, philosophy and Arabic. His academic work focuses on the Critical Theory of Religion, as it pertains to Judaism, Christianity and Islam and other forms of continental philosophy. He has published widely both on the Critical Theory of the Frankfurt School as well as Islam, the Middle East and modern forms of political violence. With Seyed Javad Miri of Tehran, Iran, he has recently co-edited a book on Malcolm X, which will be published in June, 2016, with Brill Publishers. He lives in Kalamazoo, Michigan with his family.

Gustavo Racy

Gustavo Racy is Brazilian from São Paulo. Bachelor in Social Sciences and Philosophy, he is currently a PhD Candidate at the University of Antwerp, Belgium. His present research revolves around the relation between capitalism and visual culture through a study of archive photographs of the cities of São Paulo and Antwerp aiming to explore the ways in which capitalism expresses itself visually. He has published several articles in Brazilian journals, most of them touching upon Walter Benjamin’s thinking.

María Castel

María Castel is a PhD candidate in Philosophy at University of Buenos Aires. She is an assistant professor of Aesthetic and Contemporary Philosophy at the same University. Her research project involves examining and establishing a relationship between the models of philosophical criticism of Ernst Bloch and Walter Benjamin, focusing on the realms of political and aesthetic theory.

Penny Cole

Penny Cole is the environment editor for A World to Win and co-organiser of the Glasgow Assembly for Democracy.

Alexander Katsanis

Alexander Katsanis is a student of Philosophy, Religious Studies and Political Science at Mount Allison University. His research interests are critical theory, the philosophy of science, feminist philosophy, bio-politics and 20th century Marxism. His current project aims to examine the constitution of the subject in light of evolutionary anthropological and biological insights.

Daniel Tutt

Daniel Tutt, Ph.D. is an interfaith activist and philosopher interested in Lacanian psychoanalysis, contemporary political philosophy and theology. His writing has been published in Philosophy Now, Crisis and Critique, the International Journal of Žižek Studies and the Journal of the Society for Contemporary Thought and the Islamicate World. He can be found on Twitter @danieltutt.

Glenn Parton
Fellow

Glenn Parton is the last student of Herbert Marcuse. From 1972-1979 he had many philosophical conversations with Marcuse that taught him how to think concretely. He owns and operates a small second-hand/vintage business in Redding, Ca.

Heathwood articles: http://www.heathwoodpress.com…

Michael Laurence

Michael Laurence is a PhD candidate in Political Theory at Western University, Canada. He is also an instructor in the Department of Politics and International Relations at Mount Allison University, Canada. His research focuses on critical theory, radical democratic theory, and Autonomist Marxism. His current project aims to rethink democracy as a Nietzschean vitality that exceeds and overcomes the reactive politics of the state form.

Ben Fulman

Ben Fulman is an independent scholar. Previously he worked as a research associate at the Centre for Philosophy, Religion and Social Ethics (Institute for Christian Studies). He has a PhD in philosophy and wrote his dissertation about Theodor W. Adorno’s ‘Theory of Experience’. His interests range from social critique, Frankfurt School and critical theory, German philosophy, aesthetics, ontology of objects, and playing the guitar. Currently he is writing a book about Adorno and Hegel’s Theory of Needs.

Andrew Feenberg

Andrew Feenberg holds the Canada Research Chair in the Philosophy of Technology in the School of Communication at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver. His main interests are philosophy of technology, continental philosophy, critique of technology and science and technology studies. Feenberg studied philosophy under Herbert Marcuse at the University of California San Diego and was awarded his PhD in 1972. He has since become a leading academic in critical theory, with his work in developing a critical theory of technology widely recognized among contemporary activists and scholars.

Gordon Asher

Gordon Asher is an educator/learner, researcher/writer, ‘activist’ and cultural worker based in Glasgow. A member of the burgeoning academic precariat, his central employment is as a Learning and Curriculum Developer at the University of the West of Scotland. He has previously studied and worked at the Universities of Edinburgh, Glasgow and Strathclyde.

He studied for a Masters in Adult and Continuing Education at the University of Glasgow and is currently working towards a PhD by publication, within a broad framing – ‘In, Against and Beyond the Neoliberal University’; linking critical educational theories and practices within the academy with radical education outwith the academy.

He has taught a range of courses and subjects in Higher and Adult Education, ranging from Access to Postgraduate level – in education, social sciences, law, adult education/lifelong learning and learning/educational development – as well as (often educational) engagements in, with and for radical social movements and community and cultural groups/organisations.

His interests include critical pedagogy, popular education, ecopedagogy, academic literacies/critical literacies/critical academic literacies, critical thinking/reading/writing, social movement education, adult, community and higher education.

Amongst other commitments and engagements outwith the university he is one of the co-editors of Variant magazine (http://www.variant.org.uk/) and a board member of Strickland Distribution(http://strickdistro.org/) engaging in projects such as ‘Knowledge is Never Neutral’ and ‘History from Below’

Heathwood Articles: www.heathwoodpress.com

Rudolf J. Siebert

Rudolf J. Siebert was born in Frankfurt a.M., Germany. He studied history, philology, philosophy, sociology, psychoanalysis, and theology at the University of Frankfurt a.M., the University of Mainz, the University of Munster, and the Catholic University of America, Washington D.C. from 1947 – 1955. Professor Siebert has taught, lectured, and published widely in Western and Eastern Europe, the United States, and Canada. He is a professor of Religion and Society in the Department of Comparative Religion at Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA. He is the director of the Center for Humanistic Future Studies at Western Michigan University since 1980, the director of the international course on the “Future of Religion” in the Inter-University Center for Post-Graduate Studies in Dubrovnik, Yugoslavia / Croatia since 1975, and the international course on “Religion and Civil Society” in Yalta, Crimea, and Ukraine since 1999. The Inter-University Center is sponsored by the University of Simferopol, Simferopol, Ukraine, and Western Michigan University.

Professor Siebert’s main works are The Critical Theory of Religion: Frankfurt School, and From Critical Theory to Critical Political Theology: Personal Autonomy and Universal Solidarity. From 1955 to the present, Professor Siebert has developed the critical or dialectical theory of religion out of the critical theory of society, from the endeavors of the Institute for Social Research at the University of Frankfurt, globally known as the “Frankfurt School,” and in continual discourse with sociologists, psychologists, anthropologists, economists, philosophers, religiologists, and theologians from the United States, Canada, England, Belgium, Holland, France, Germany, Yugoslavia / Croatia, Israel, and Columbia. The dialectical theory of religion emphasizes the three global alternative futures of society: Future I – the totally administered society; Future II – the entirely militarized society; and Future III – the reconciled society. It stresses the three global alternative futures of religion: Future I – religious fundamentalism; Future II – total secularization; Future III – the open dialectic between the religious and the secular aiming at a post-modern reconciliation between a reformed religion and a transformed secular enlightenment.

Rudolf Siebert and his late wife Margaret nee Noyes had 8 children, 14 grandchildren, and 1 great grandchild.

Heathwood Articles: http://www.heathwoodpress.com

Stephen Eric Bronner

STEPHEN ERIC BRONNER was born in 1949. He received his B.A. from the City College of New York and his Ph.D. from the University of California: Berkeley. The Senior Editor of Logos, an interdisciplinary internet journal, a member of more than a dozen other editorial boards, he is also Chair of the Executive Committee of US Academics for Peace and an advisor to Conscience International. He has taken part in missions of civic diplomacy in Darfur, Iran, Iraq, Syria, Sudan, and elsewhere. Blood in the Sand: Imperial Fantasies, Rightwing Ambitions, and the Erosion of American Democracy and Peace Out of Reach: Middle Eastern Travels and the Search for Reconciliation (University Press of Kentucky) reflect this interest. Professor Bronner’s works have been translated into a dozen languages. They include: Socialism Unbound: Principles, Practices, Prospects (Columbia University Press), Camus: Portrait of a Moralist (University of Chicago Press), Critical Theory: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford University Press), and Of Critical Theory and Its Theorists (Routledge). Particularly concerned with issues of bigotry and tolerance, his Reclaiming the Enlightenment (Columbia University Press) and A Rumor about the Jews (Oxford University Press) have become standard works. His most recent work is The Bigot: Why Prejudice Persists (Yale University Press). Stephen Eric Bronner is the Board of Governors Professor at Rutgers University. He is also Director of Global Relations and on the Executive Committee of the UNESCO Chair for Genocide Prevention at the Center for the Study of Genocide and Human Rights. Professor Bronner is the recipient of many awards including the 2011 MEPeace Prize from the Middle East Political Network based in Jerusalem.

Heathwood Articles: http://www.heathwoodpress.com

Adam Bell

Since completing Bachelors and Masters degrees in Music Composition at the Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama, Adam Bell has been undertaking a PhD in Music at Brunel University under the supervision of Christopher Fox. His research has focused on the formulation of a unified aesthetic, a Quantum Music, from which all his works must adhere. Aligned with the high modernist works of the post-1945 integral serial composers of the First Darmstadt School, Milton Babbitt, Iannis Xenakis and the so-called ‘New Complexity’ composers (et al.), Adam’s works seek a pureness of abstraction through the application of point-gestures to determine macro- and micro-level parametric assignments. Most recently, in June 2015 Adam’s Two-Slit Experiments for solo piano (2010) received its world premier by the acclaimed pianist Ian Pace at the City Summer Sounds Festival, City University London.

Heathwood Articles: http://www.heathwoodpress.com

Martyn Hudson

Martyn is a critical theorist and sociologist. His book on slave cultures and capitalism is forthcoming from Ashgate press – The Slave Ship, Memory and the Origin of Modernity (2015). He has published widely in sound studies, critical theory, history and cultural landscapes. He is a refugee rights activist and works with a number of organisations such as Music Action International and the Rohingya Survival Foundation and is a researcher at Newcastle University, UK.

Heathwood Articles: http://www.heathwoodpress.com

Dr. Peyman Vahabzadeh

Peyman Vahabzadeh was born and raised in Iran. He immigrated to Canada in 1989 and feels at home in coastal British Columbia.

Dr. Vahabzadeh received his BA in Sociology and Anthropology and his PhD in Sociology from Simon Fraser University (2000). Vahabzadeh’s dissertation, which was supported by a SSHRC Doctoral Fellowship and supervised by Dr. Ian Angus, was awarded the SFU Dean of Graduate Studies Convocation Medal for Academic Excellence in the Faculty of Arts (2001).

Between 2001 and 2003, Dr. Vahabzadeh held a SSHRC-funded Postdoctoral Fellowship in the Department of Political Science, University of Victoria (under the supervision of Dr. Warren Magnusson). Dr. Vahabzadeh has taught sociology, political science, CSPT, and humanities at SFU, UVic and Brock University (Ontario).

Dr. Vahabzadeh’s lifelong interest is in human (collective) action and social movements. He continues to study the generative power of social movements for societal renewal and the conditions under which individuals become actors, activists, or agents—in short, the historical individual.

Dr. Vahabzadeh uses a rather unique approach to study this vast and complex area. His approach is called radical (or temporal) phenomenology, a recent extension of the long tradition of phenomenology and phenomenological sociology. Radical phenomenology places acting and thinking in epochal frames, showing that truth has a temporal character, conditioned by different eras offering different, and changing, possibilities for acting and thinking. Combined with his interest in Continental European thought in the nineteenth and twentieth century, phenomenology has become the guiding theory that informs the scholarly and non-scholarly works of Dr. Vahabzadeh.

His areas of research and teaching include: classical and contemporary social theory, social movements, phenomenology, exile, and Iranian Studies. Dr. Vahabzadeh teaches the core undergraduate and graduate theory courses in the Department. He is the author of Articulated Experiences: Toward A Radical Phenomenology of Contemporary Social Movements (State University of New York Press, 2003) and A Guerrilla Odyssey: Modernization, Secularism, Democracy and the Fadai Discourse of National Liberation in Iran, 1971-1979 (Syracuse University Press, 2010), Exilic Meditations: Essays on A Displaced Life (H&S Media, 2013), the guest editor of the special issue of West Coast Line on “Writing Rupture: Iranian Emigration Literature” (2003) and the co-guest editor of the special issue of the Journal for Cultural and Religious Theory on “Democracy, Religion, and the Politics of Fright” (2007).

Dr. Vahabzadeh has also authored eight books in Persian in poetry, fiction, literary criticism, and memoirs. He has been a regular commentator on Iranian affairs in Canadian media. Dr. Vahabzadeh is an advocate of democratic movements and human rights in Iran and a defender of non-violence and alternative social organizations. His essays, poems, short stories, memoirs, literary criticisms, and interviews have appeared in English, Persian, German, and Kurdish.

Heathwood Articles: http://www.heathwoodpress.com

Sarah Amsler
Editor / Fellow

Sarah Amsler is a sociologist, critical theorist and reader in Education at the University of Lincoln (UK). She is also a member of the Social Science Centre, an autonomous higher education co-operative (http://socialsciencecentre.org.uk). Her work centres on the politics of knowledge, education, political economy and cultural practice. She uses critical theory and research to understand how these shape the formation of individual and collective subjectivities, the consolidation of and resistance to political-economic and cultural domination, and the material and symbolic organisation of both everyday life and political possibility.

She is particularly concerned with:

  • the pedagogical dimensions of neoliberal forms of power and powerlessness;
  • the cultural and material politics of radical democracy, particularly in its prefigurative and dissensual forms;
  • the place of knowledge and education in Frankfurt School, post-structuralist and anarchistic traditions of critical theory;
  • the educative qualities, ethical demands and embodied experience of co-operative, utopian and radical-democratic politics;
  • the activation and advancement of critical philosophy, theory and pedagogy in educational work and activism; and
  • the recognition of politico-educative practice as a primary site of political formation and transformation, whose theorisation is central to the critique of capitalism and authoritarian social logics.

She has special interests in the work of Theodor Adorno, Ernst Bloch and Herbert Marcuse; feminist, Marxist and anarchistic theories and practices of critical pedagogy; the critical sociology of education; and the relationship between critical philosophy, participatory research and political formation.

Sarah is presently working on a study of ‘Practices of Possibility in Neoliberal Social Systems’, funded by the Independent Social Research Foundation (http://www.isrf.org/about/current-fellows/). She has recently published a book entitled The Education of Radical Democracy (2015) and co-edited Acts of Knowing: Critical Pedagogy In, Against and Beyond the University (with S. Cowden, J. Canaan, S. Motta and G. Singh, 2013). Links to her other writing are available at http://amsler.blogs.lincoln.ac.uk.

Heathwood articles: http://www.heathwoodpress.com..

Henry Giroux

Henry A. Giroux currently holds the Global TV Network Chair Professorship at McMaster University in the English and Cultural Studies Department and the Paulo Freire Distinguished Scholar Chair in Critical pedagogy.  He is also a Distinguished Visiting Professorship at Ryerson University. His most recent books include: Zombie Politics and Culture in the Age of Casino Capitalism, 2nd edition (Peter Lang, 2014) The Violence of Organized Forgetting: Thinking Beyond America’s Disimagination Machine (City Lights, 2014); Higher Education After Neoliberalism (Haymarket, 2014); Dangerous Thinking in the Age of the New Authoritarianism (Paradigm 2015). Disposable Futures (co authored with Brad Evans)  will be published by City Lights in 2015). Giroux’s web site is www.henryagiroux.com.

Heathwood Articles: http://www.heathwoodpress.com

Jose Luis Vivero Pol

Jose Luis Vivero Pol is a PhD research fellow at the University of Louvain, Belgium. An agricultural engineer by the University of Cordoba (Spain) with graduate courses in natural areas management and development, he is a anti-hunger and social rights activist with more than 14 years of experience on food security policies and programmes, right to food advocacy and food sovereignty movements in Latin America, Africa and Europe. His current research seeks to understand personal motivations, collective action institutions, political incentives and institutional frameworks to gear the transition from the dominant industrial food system towards a fairer and more sustainable one, developing a rationale for considering food as a commons and understanding the role of bridging organisations and policy beliefs in the transition pathways. Two of his latest books are New Challenges to the Right to Food (2011, Huygens, Barcelona) and Derecho a la Alimentación, Políticas Públicas e Instituciones contra el Hambre (2009, LOM, Santiago).

You can learn more about Jose, here.

Heathwood Articles: http://www.heathwoodpress.com

Raihan Sharif
Editor / Fellow

Raihan Sharif is an Assistant Professor in English at Jahangirnagar University. He worked as a Fulbright Scholar (from 2011 to 2013) in Department of Critical Culture, Gender, and Race Studies at Washington State University, USA. Raihan is a scholar-activist, organizer, lyricist, and poet. In his scholarly works, he spatializes resistance against homo-neoliberal and neo-imperial forces while decolonizing influential academic discourses: sexual citizenship, queer politics, neoliberal diversity, hybridity discourses, etc.

Raihan also examines unequal power relations along the host/migrant paradigm in the US; challenges the politics of native agents in diasporic fictions; destabilizes global Islamophobia within the frame of moral panic in the west; critiques abandonment of disabled and poor people in the global south; exposes the imperial logic of hybridity discourses (Bhabha); studies creation, growth, and sustainability of academic programs related to inequality (e.g. ethnic, LGBTQ, disability, critical cultural studies); examines dissenting citizenship (Maira); and investigates queer asylum cases.

Heathwood Articles: http://www.heathwoodpress.com

Joel R. Pruce

Joel R. Pruce is assistant professor of human rights studies at the University of Dayton, where he previously served as post-doctoral fellow. Joel holds his doctorate from the University of Denver’s Josef Korbel School of International Studies where he also held the position of Lecturer in International Human Rights. His research interests include non-governmental organizations and advocacy, foreign policy, international organization, mass media and visual culture, and critical theory. Joel is the editor of a new collaborative volume, The Social Practice of Human Rights (Forthcoming). He has contributed several book chapters, including “Spectacle of Suffering and Humanitarian Intervention in Somalia” in Media, Mobilization, and Human Rights: Mediating Atrocity (Borer 2012), and “Constituencies of Compassion: The Politics of Human Rights and Consumerism” in Uses and Misuses of Human Rights (Andreopoulos and Arat 2014). Joel has published book reviews in Journal of Human Rights, Millennium: Journal of International Studies, and Perspectives on Politics.

Heathwood Articles: http://www.heathwoodpress.com

Elliot Sperber

Elliot Sperber is a writer, attorney, and theorist focusing on, among other things, the relationship between law, violence, and justice. He lives in New York City. More of his writings can be found here.

Heathwood Articles: http://www.heathwoodpress.com…

Douglas Kellner

Douglas Kellner is the George F. Kneller Philosophy of Education Chair at UCLA, working mainly in the field of Frankfurt School critical theory. Doug was an early theorist of the field of critical media literacy and has been a leading theorist of media culture generally. For more information, please see Doug’s author profile

Heathwood Articles: http://www.heathwoodpress.com

Dr. Jeanne Willette

Art historian and art critic, Dr. Jeanne S. M. Willette lives and works in Los Angeles. An art historian at Otis College of Art and Design, the widely published author covers the local art scene and is the publisher of the website Art History Unstuffed. With an international audience, this website and its accompanying podcasts provides the 21st version of learning about art, history, philosophy and theory. Synthesizing the most updated research and commentary on topics in modern and contemporary art and theory, the website issues weekly posts which explain challenging concepts for an audience of art history peers and advanced students of art and philosophy. Designed to built knowledge for the reader, the posts are arranged chronologically and categorically. Beginning art history students are invited to view a series of almost thirty videos, written and produced by Dr. Willette, on the survey of art, an Art History Timeline, from the Caves through Romanticism, accessed through iTunesU and YouTube by thousands of readers. In addition to Art History Unstuffed, Dr. Willette has published a book of her podcasts, Art History Unstuffed: The Podcasts is available through the iBooks. Long interested in the creation and construction of discourses, Dr. Willette has published a book on the intellectual matrix of original art critical response to Cubism, The Writing of Cubism: The Construction of a Discourse 1910-1914 and New Artwriting. Creating a Culture of Cyber Criticism, an examination of the production of knowledge in a postmodern age of “little narratives,” both available on her Amazon page.

Heathwood Articles: http://www.heathwoodpress.com

Shirin Housee

Dr Shirin Housee is Senior lecturer in Sociology at the University of Wolverhampton. She has been involved with research endeavours in the field of education, with specific remits on access, progression and general equal opportunities for over 25 years. Her current projects are in anti-racist education in Higher Education. Read more about Shirin here.

Heathwood Articles: http://www.heathwoodpress.com

Marisol Sandoval

Marisol Sandoval is a Lecturer at the Department of Culture and Creative Industries at City University London. She is author of “From Corporate to Social Media. Critical Perspectives on Corporate Social Responsibility in Media and Communication Industries” (Routledge 2014) and managing editor of the open access journal tripleC – Communication, Capitalism and Critique. You can learn more about Marisol here.

Heathwood Articles: http://www.heathwoodpress.com

Christian Fuchs

Christian Fuchs is professor of media and communication studies at the University of Westminster. He is the author of numerous titles, including Foundations of Critical Media and Information Studies and Internet and Society: Social Theory in the Information Age. You can find more information about Christian here.

Heathwood Articles: http://www.heathwoodpress.com

Javier Sethness Castro

Javier Sethness Castro, author of Imperiled Life: Revolution against Climate Catastrophe (AK Press/Institute for Anarchist Studies, 2012) and For a Free Nature: Critical Theory, Social Ecology, and Post-Developmentalism (Lambert Academic Press, 2013), has had essays and articles published in Truthout, Counterpunch, Dissident Voice, Anarkismo, Countercurrents, Climate and Capitalism, MRZine, Dysophia, The Journal of Critical Globalisation Studies, and Perspectives on Anarchist Theory.”. He is also the author of the forthcoming Eros and Revolution: The Critical Philosophy of Herbert Marcuse (Brill Publishers/Haymarket Books) and a member of the Black Rose/Rosa Negra Anarchist Federation.

Heathwood Articles: http://www.heathwoodpress.com

Merijn Oudenampsen

Merijn Oudenampsen is a PhD candidate at the University of Tilburg, where he is investigating Dutch political populism. He was editor of the special issue “The Populist Imagination” for Open (NAi 2010), and co-editor of Power to the People, een anatomie van het populisme (Boom 2012). You can read more about Merijn here.

Stephanie Baran

Stephanie Baran is an adjunct professor at Kankakee Community College. She received her M.A. in Sociology from DePaul University in Chicago. She is a professor, researcher and activist and is an avid student of Marxist theory. Her academic interests include studying white supremacy, racism, capitalism and the socio-political process. She can be contacted at smbaran@yahoo.com.

Heathwood Articles: http://www.heathwoodpress.com

Simon Clarke

Simon Clarke is Emeritus Professor at Warwick University. Clarke’s main publications are The Foundations of Structuralism; Marx, Marginalism and Modern Sociology; Keynesianism, Monetarism and the Crisis of the State; and Marx’s Theory of Crisis (with Peter Fairbrother, Michael Burawoy and Pavel Krotov). You can read more about Simon here.

Heathwood Articles: http://www.heathwoodpress.com

Matthew Morgan

Matthew Morgan is a PhD candidate in the department of political science at York University and a researcher at the York Centre for International and Security studies. Matthew’s research is based in the areas of Marxist political economy and critical security studies.

You can find a large selection of Matthew’s work here

Heathwood Articles: http://www.heathwoodpress.com

Mary Breunig

Mary Breunig is an Associate Professor at Brock University, Canada and President of the Association for Experiential Education. Her scholarship is aimed at bridging the theory/practice gap and is grounded in critical pedagogy and Freiran praxis; her teaching and research apply to trip guiding, environmental education policy, social justice pedagogy, experiential education, and friluftsliv. She continues to guide extended wilderness trips for the National Outdoor Leadership School and works as a researcher for Outward Bound Canada.

Heathwood Articles: http://www.heathwoodpress.com

Maria Alina Asavei

Maria Alina Asavei is an art theorist and curator from Budapest.  She works principally in the areas of art and disability, artistic collectives, politics of aesthetics, forms of artistic engagement during and after totalitarian regimes. As a PhD candidate in Philosophy of Art at the Central European University, her thesis is on Political-Critical Art and the Aesthetic. Her current research focuses on Artistic Collectivism, Roma Contemporary Art and Economies of Pleasure.

Heathwood Articles: http://www.heathwoodpress.com

Karsten Fischer

Karsten Fischer holds the chair for Political Theory at the University of Munich, Germany. Before, he studied Political Science, Philosophy and Public International Law at the Universities of Bonn and Frankfurt/M. and wrote his dissertation on the theories of civilization in Nietzsche, Freud, Weber, and Adorno at Humboldt-University Berlin. Afterwards he has written books about the use of moral arguments in debates on the welfare state and about religion in the liberal state. Currently he is interested i.a. in political iconography and in the democratic theory of liberal constitutionalism. For further informations (http://www.gsi.uni-muenchen.de/lehreinheiten/ls_pt2/index.html)

Heathwood Articles: http://www.heathwoodpress.com

Magdalena Wisniowska

Magdalena Wisniowska is an artist and writer, currently based in Munich.  After finishing her postgraduate studies at the Royal Academy Schools, she completed her PhD in Visual Cultures at Goldsmiths, London in 2010.  In the last few years she has divided her time between studio work and lecturing at Goldsmiths, City and Guilds of London Art School and the Royal Academy.  She is also a founding member on InC, Continental Philosophy Research Group.  Her research interests include: aesthetics and the philosophy of art (specifically the work of Kant, Hegel, Adorno and Deleuze), theories of the imagination and 20th century art).

Fabian Freyenhagen

Fabian Freyenhagen is a Reader in Philosophy at the University of Essex, UK. His publications on Adorno include a monograph entitled Adorno¹s Practical Philosophy: Living Less Wrongly (CUP 2013). He has also published on Kant, Hegel, contemporary political philosophy, and ethics. For penultimate drafts of some of these works, see here

Heathwood Articles: http://www.heathwoodpress.com

Richard Hall

Richard is the head of Enhancing Learning through Technology (ELT) at De Montfort University in Leicester, UK. He is also a National Teaching Fellow (2009) and a Professor of Education and Technology (2010). In the latter role, Richard is a research associate in the Centre for Computing and Social Responsibility at DMU. You can learn more about Richard here

Heathwood Articles: http://www.heathwoodpress.com

Helene Finidori

Helene Finidori is an author, researcher and consultant focused on systemic change and transformative action. Co-founder and coordinator of the Commons Abundance Network, she teaches Management and Leadership of Change in the International Program of Staffordshire University. You can read more about Helene here.

Heathwood Articles: http://www.heathwoodpress.com

Ryan Moore

Ryan Moore is assistant professor of sociology at CUNY-Queensborough Community College and the author of Sells like Teen Spirit: Music, Youth Culture, and Social Crisis (NYU Press, 2010). His scholarly interests lie at the intersection of critical theory, popular music, and youth subcultures. His current research involves interviewing activists from Occupy Wall Street. He lives in New York City.

Heathwood Articles: http://www.heathwoodpress.com

Gayle Kimball

Gayle Kimball, Ph.D., is the author or editor of 14 books and has been a teacher and professor most of her adult life. Her recent research concerns an extensive study of the Global Youth Movement. Contact her at gkimball@csuchico.edu.

Dr. Chris Conti

Dr. Chris Conti is an Associate Lecturer in Literary Studies in the School of Humanities and Communication Arts and member of the Writing and Society Research Centre. His primary research interests and teaching experience are in the field of modernist and contemporary literature and philosophy and literature. He has written articles on Theodor Adorno, John Barth, Samuel Beckett, Franz Kafka, and Patrick White. Read more about Chris here.

Heathwood Articles: http://www.heathwoodpress.com

Thomas Swann

Thomas Swann is a PhD student at the University of Leicester School of Management and a member of the Centre for Philosophy and Political Economy. His research focuses on radical left organization, social media and organizational cybernetics. Thomas has several years of experience as an activist in anarchist and socialist groups in the UK and the Netherlands. He blogs at social media and radical politics and can be followed on Twitter via @thomasswann1.

Heathwood Articles: http://www.heathwoodpress.com

Beth M. Titchiner
Co-founder / Fellow

Beth Titchiner is a co-founder of Heathwood, writing largely in the field of Education. Her work entails the critique of contemporary educational practices, the critical retrieval of radical alternative ideas about education, and also the development of an ‘experientially coherent’ approach to teaching and learning. Beth has studied at post-graduate and graduate level in the areas of Communication, Social Development and Education, and her work is deeply inspired by Adornian Critical Social Theory, Phenomenology, Psychotherapy and the Existential, as well as the writings of John Holt, A. S. Neill, John Dewey, Ivan Illich, and Maria Montessori. Beth has worked in a variety of educational settings in both the UK and Latin-America, and is a long-standing advocate of humane educational approaches which strive to do justice to the experience, needs, dignity and heathly development of both students and teachers.

Heathwood articles: http://www.heathwoodpress.com..

Robert Drury King

Robert Drury King writes in the fields of recent European philosophy, systems theory (with particular interests in dissipative systems, constructivist epistemology, and autopoiesis) and Marxism, viewed minimally as systemic and structural critique at the intersections of theory and activism.  All of Robert’s research revolves around the goals of identifying the kinds of systems that define the core social, ecological, economic, and political problems of contemporary life and of determining the ways in which we, as one species among many others, ought to work towards constructing novel forms of sustainable social life, broadly construed.

Robert views the project of a critical theory to be the one in which any such determination of novel forms of social life would proceed from the ground of a presuppositionless thought, geared towards a systemic critique of the ideologies that attract the decisions and actions of our daily life toward non-novel and non-sustainable ends. Robert is highly influenced by Hegelian dialectics, Frankfurt School critical theory, French post-structuralist theory, including especially the work of Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari, the Marxism of István Mészáros, and a range of systems theories from cybernetics to autopoiesis, the biology of cognition, and the recent thinking of the entropy of the system of capital through the theoretical framework of dissipative systems, such as is being pioneered by Robert Biel.

Heathwood Articles: http://www.heathwoodpress.com..

Works in Progress:

* “Can Capital Be Described as a System?”. In this study I will ask the practical question: Can capital/capitalism be described as a system? We make casual reference to the term, capitalist system, but what supports this casual usage?  It has long been recognized that the term capitalism itself is used in a tremendous variety of contexts, for a diverse set of purposes, and it is the aim of this research to sketch out how capitalism forms as a system. For a complete overview please see here

* “Temporal and Conceptual Logics of Structure-Determined Systems“. One of my recent projects entails examining the systems-theoretical notion of time—in the context of the human experience of time—as it is given in the system of capital, with a mind to alternative forms of societal reproduction (e.g., pre-capitalist social formations).  Thus, I address the temporal (but also spatial) logic(s) of the capital system and its precursors in order to specifically define capital as an autonomous social system. For more information please see the following overview here

Adrian Wilding
Editor / Fellow

Adrian Wilding teaches at the Institut für Philosophie, Friedrich-Schiller Universität Jena. He is also a Fellow of the Großbritannien-Zentrum, Humboldt-Universität Berlin. Some of his recent publications can be found here.

Heathwood Articles: http://www.heathwoodpress.com..

Richard Gunn
Editor / Fellow

Richard Gunn lectured on political theory at the University of Edinburgh from 1975 to 2011. Between 1987 and 1997, he was a member of the Common Sense editorial collective. He currently writes and researches on an independent basis. His personal website (http://richard-gunn.com) contains papers dating from the 1980s to more recent years.

Heathwood Articles: http://www.heathwoodpress.com..

Timothy Hawkins
Editor

Timothy Hawkins holds a bachelor and master of music in music education from the State University of New York at Fredonia, and is currently a doctoral student in music education at Boston University. His areas of expertise include brass instruction, implementation of digital media in the music curriculum, composition, and group-piano instruction. His research interests include informal knowledge of music composition using digital media, and the application of critical theory to teaching general music.

https://soundcloud.com/t_hawkins

Heathwood articles: http://www.heathwoodpress.com..

Michael R. Ott
Editor / Fellow

Michael R. Ott holds a Ph.D. in Sociology from Western Michigan University [1998] and a Master of Divinity degree from Princeton Theological Seminary [1975]. In 1976, Michael was ordained a minister in the United Church of Christ and served the next 25 years as a pastor of 3 churches in Michigan. In 2002, he accepted a position as a Professor of Sociology at Grand Valley State University, where he specialized in the study, teaching and advancement of the critical theory of society and religion of the “Frankfurt School.” He incorporated this critical theoretical paradigm, which seeks the socio-historical creation of a more reconciled, humane future society, both in the church and in his courses on: Sociology/Critical Theory of Religion; Contemporary Sociological Theory; Globalization: Structures and Movements; Social Class Inequality; The Theory and Praxis of Social Change Movements; the Senior Seminar in Sociology/Capstone; Social Problems, and Christianity: Scriptures, Traditions, and Hope for the Future. Since his retirement from the university in 2015, he now works as a private researcher and writer on developing the revolutionary critique of the Critical Theory of the first generation of the Frankfurt School in addressing the contemporary crises of global capitalism and its global class-war hegemony. His publications include numerous articles and book chapters on the critical theory of society and religion, as well as five published books: Max Horkheimer’s Critical Theory of Religion: The Meaning of Religion in the Struggle for Human Emancipation [University Press of America 2001]; an edited volume entitled The Future of Religion: Toward a Reconciled Society [BRILL 2007 & Haymarket Press 2009]]; an edited volume entitled, The Dialectics of the Religious and the Secular: Studies on the Future of Religion [BRILL 2014 & Haymarket Press 2016]; and a co-authored book with Rudolf J. Siebert entitled: The Future of Religion: Creator, Exodus, Son of Man and Kingdom [2016], New Delhi: Sanbun Publishers. Michael is a Co-Director of the international course The Future of Religion, held annually since 1977 at the Inter-University Centre of Post-Graduate Studies in Dubrovnik, Croatia. Michael is an Editor and Research Fellow for the Heathwood Institute and Press in the U.K. He is also a member of the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies Institute’s Global Advisory Board. For the past 39 years, Michael has been married to Mary Louise [Pierotti] Ott, with whom they have 2 adult sons [Michael Rudolf & John Robert], and 4 grandchildren.

Heathwood articles: http://www.heathwoodpress.com..

R.C. Smith
Founder / Executive Editor

R.C. Smith is an academic, author and science student. He is currently pursuing a PhD in Theoretical Physics, while also actively writing in Philosophy of Science. You can learn more on his website: www.rc-smith.com

Heathwood Articles: http://www.heathwoodpress.com..

Arnold De Graaff
Fellow

Arnold De Graaff writes mainly in the fields of Psychotherapy, Education, Theology and Existential-Phenomenology, dealing with such issues as educational alternatives, radical psychology, integrated psychotherapy and the meaning of faith. Having originally studied in Philosophy, Sociology, English Literature and Greek, Arnold switched his focus to both psychology and education at the Free University in Amsterdam. In 1966 he received his doctoral degree in Practical Theology. For the next fourteen years Arnold taught psychology and education at the undergraduate and graduate levels in Chicago and Toronto. During that time he taught summer courses for teachers and started the Curriculum Development Centre in Toronto, of which he was the director for four years. Arnold was also advisor to an alternative high school in Toronto and for three years the coordinator of an Outdoor Learning Project near Orangeville, Ontario.

Wanting to work more practically, Arnold enrolled in an intensive psychotherapy training program in 1974. Since 1980 he has been a full-time therapist both in Toronto and Orangeville, Canada developing what is known as a more integrated form of psychotherapy, which takes into account both the integral unity of the person and the person’s social context. He has written a number of papers on psychology (Psychology: Sensitive Openness and Appropriate Reactions); on education (Backwards into the Future); and psychotherapy (A Critical Essay: An Evaluation of James H. Olthuis’ The Beautiful Risk: A New Psychology of Loving and Being Loved); as well as many others.

The last number of years Arnold has been working on a timely manuscript dealing with a radical, alternative approach to theology and the question of faith, and the role people’s deepest convictions play in the course of their lives.

Heathwood Articles: http://www.heathwoodpress.com..

Dr Peter Thompson

Peter Thompson has been teaching at the University of Sheffield since 1990. His research interests include the post-war history of the GDR and German unification, but his main area of research is in the field of Ernst Bloch studies, encompassing not only his period in the GDR from 1949 to 1961 – when he was Professor of Philosophy at Leipzig University and centrally involved in oppositional Marxist activities of the Harich-Gruppe of the mid 1950s – but also in the philosophical impact of his theories of “Concrete Utopia” and the central role of hope in social transformation.

Peter is also the Director of The Centre for Ernst Bloch Studies, which was established at Sheffield in 2008.

Heathwood Articles: http://www.heathwoodpress.com

Richard D. Wolff

Richard D. Wolff is an American heterodox economist, well known for his work on Marxian economics, economic methodology, and class analysis. He is Professor of Economics Emeritus, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and currently a Visiting Professor in the Graduate Program in International Affairs of the New School University in New York. Wolff has also taught economics at Yale University, City University of New York, University of Utah, University of Paris I (Sorbonne), and The Brecht Forum in New York City.

Heathwood Articles: http://www.heathwoodpress.com

Glenn Rikowski

Dr. Glenn Rikowski is a Marxist educational theorist and thinker on the future of the human and social time. He worked at the University of Northampton, England, up to 31st October 2013, where I taught Education Studies. Some of Glenn’s publications include: The Battle in Seattle: Its Significance for Education (2001, Tufnell Press), Red Chalk: On Schooling, Capitalism and Politics (2001, The Institute for Education Policy Studies) – written with Dave Hill, Mike Cole and Peter McLaren Marxism Against Postmodernism in Educational Theory (with Dave Hill, Peter McLaren and Mike Cole) (2002, Lexington Books), and Renewing Dialogues in Marxism and Education – Openings (edited with Anthony Green and Helen Raduntz) (2007, Palgrave Macmillan).

Heathwood Articles: http://www.heathwoodpress.com

Michel Bauwens

Michel Bauwens (born 21 March 1958) is a Belgian Peer-to-Peer theorist and an active writer, researcher and conference speaker on the subject of technology, culture and business innovation. Michel Bauwens is a theorist in the emerging field of P2P theory and director and founder of the P2P Foundation, a global organization of researchers working in collaboration in the exploration of peer production, governance, and property. He has authored a number of essays, including his seminal thesis The Political Economy of Peer Production.

Chris Cutrone

Born in 1970 and raised in Valley Stream on Long Island near New York City, Chris Cutrone teaches in the Department of Art History, Theory and Criticism at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and is a lecturer in the Social Sciences Collegiate Division at the University of Chicago, where he completed the PhD in the Committee on the History of Culture and MA in Art History. He received the MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and the BA from Hampshire College. His doctoral dissertation is on Adorno’s Marxism.

Heathwood Articles: http://www.heathwoodpress.com